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QOTD

'Mr Fawnshope, having written some thirty lines of his tragedy the previous day, with which he was not dissatisfied, was in a complaisant humor, neither chasing an elusive epithet, nor brooding over an infelicitous line. He said everything that was proper, and, when all enquiries into the invalid's condition were exhausted, conversed on various topics so much like a sensible man that Mr Rivenhall found himself quite in charity with him, and was only driven from the room by Lady Ombersley's request to the poet to read aloud to her his lyric on Annabel's deliverance from danger. Even this abominable affectation could not wholly dissipate the kindlier feelings with which he regarded Mr Fawnthorpe, whose continued visits to the house gave him a better opinion of the poet than was at all deserved. Cecilia could have told him that Mr Fawnthorpe's intrepidity sprang more from a sublime unconsciousness of the risk of infection than from any deliberate heroism, but since she was not in the habit of discussing her lover with her brother he continued in a happy state of ignorance, himself too practical a man to comprehend the density of the veil in which a poet could wrap himself.' (Georgette Heyer, The Grand Sophy)

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( 6 comments — Leave a comment )
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randy_byers
Jan. 10th, 2016 09:07 pm (UTC)
I actually haven't read any Bujold yet, but maybe now that I'm getting into Heyer I should try this one. Is it a decent starting point? Never heard of Milan before.
(Deleted comment)
(Deleted comment)
randy_byers
Jan. 11th, 2016 04:17 am (UTC)
Well, your enthusiasm is infectious, but that makes it a much bigger time investment, so who knows whether I'll ever get a round tuit.
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( 6 comments — Leave a comment )

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